PRESENTATION ON A MATHS PHENOMENON Time limit – 5 minute video presentation.

PRESENTATION ON A MATHS PHENOMENON Time limit – 5 minute video presentation. We need what we are presenting in written form with all the assessment details included below and then I will create the video presentation from the written work. (5 minutes is approximately 1000 words, written) and a separate 200 word rationale. (so 1200 words all up). Assessment overview This assessment requires you to create a video presentation and write a rationale. The video will demonstrate an engaging maths activity using an everyday phenomena (Nature) and the rationale will justify your choice and explain how this activity could be used with children. This task is assessing your ability to demonstrate that you meet the criteria for the following unit learning outcomes: 3. Identify everyday phenomena that can be explained using mathematics. 4. Recognise and develop opportunities for numeracy and mathematics related experiences in play, and everyday experiences in early childhood settings. Assessment details Maths phenomenon: a fact, an impressive maths occurrence, a maths ‘miracle’ or an event which can be explained using maths. This assessment is an opportunity for you to show how maths can be fun and used to explain an ‘everyday phenomenon’. You should choose a maths phenomenon which relates to the following topics of ‘Nature’. There are two components to this task (Part A and Part B): Part A You are required to create a 5-minute video presentation that shows how you would use your selected phenomenon as the basis for a maths activity and explain the maths activity to the target audience (either babies, toddlers, children from 3-4 years, or 4-6 years of age etc). Only choose one age group. In preparing your presentation you must: • define the appropriate age group for your activity • consider how you can physically engage your audience (i.e. engaging eye contact through the presentation and how to deliver the activity to children that is fun and exciting). Also need to cover the 2 points below: • identify mathematical phenomena that can be found in nature • recognise opportunities for maths experiences based on nature. Part B Submit a 200-word rationale separate from the 1000 word part that I will submit as a presentation, that justifies why you have chosen your particular phenomena and explains how you would apply the maths activity with children. This should also identify why it is appropriate for your intended audience, and describe any supporting resources. In the 200 word rationale it needs APA style referencing. The maths activity with the selected target audience could be about geometry, or symmetry etc and how to get the selected audience intrigued, learning and having fun with it. Adding this little part for you to get a sense of mathematics in nature. Ever look at a leaf and wonder why it could be divided exactly in half, or notice the perfect shapes of stars in different flowers’ petals, the spiral growth pattern of a certain shell, of pine cones, of the growth pattern of hair on a human head, or of the branches and bark of redwood trees? Nature abounds with examples of mathematical concepts. In our search to explain and understand how things are formed, we look for patterns and similarities that can be measured and categorized. This is why mathematics is used to explain natural phenomena. (Pappas, 2011, p. 149)



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